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On October 18, 2013, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and European Commission President José Manuel Barroso signed an agreement in principle. Negotiations ended on 1 August 2014. [25] The trade agreement was formally presented on September 25, 2014 by Harper and Barroso at an EU-Canada summit at the Royal York Hotel in downtown Toronto. [26] The Canada Europe Roundtable for Business has served as a parallel trade process from the inception to the end of the CETA negotiations. However, Canadian companies should consider how new relationships between the UK and the EU could impact them at the end of the transition period, including the outcome of a trade agreement, and take appropriate steps to reduce risk. PROPONENTs of CETA point out that the agreement will boost trade between the EU and Canada, creating new jobs, facilitating trade by removing tariffs, physical controls and other levies, facilitating mutual recognition of diplomas and resolving investment disputes by creating a new judicial system. [14] [15] Opponents argue that CETA would weaken the rights of European consumers, including high European food safety standards[16] and criticise it as a blessing for large corporations and multinationals, while risking net losses, unemployment and environmental damage that affect citizens. [17] [19] The agreement also includes a controversial investor-state dispute settlement mechanism, which never lets critics sue national governments for billions of dollars if they believe government policy has had a negative effect on their business. [15] A February 2017 survey by the Angus Reid Institute found that 55 per cent of Canadians support CETA, while only 10 per cent oppose IT. However, support has decreased compared to the 2014 survey. [20] On the other hand, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has a 44 per cent approval rate among Canadians in February 2017.

[21] Unlike Canada, the agreement has sparked protests in a number of European countries.